Because... getting dressed should be fun!

Because... getting dressed should be fun!

Category: Color

How to Wear Colored Shoes

How to Wear Colored Shoes

I love colored shoes! I may have a bona fide problem, but I’m not interested in recovery. I know some people think colored shoes weird, or impractical, but I have never found them to be so. Many women will wear colored tennis shoes and flip flops, but buying a colored “dress shoe” strike fear into many a heart. If you have been on the fence, here are some pointers…

Pick a Color You Love!

You are more likely to wear something if the color is one you love. Applied to the matter at hand, that would mean buying shoes in one of your favorite colors. Ideally, you will already have other pieces that will coordinate with your new shoes. They don’t need to be an exact match. Let me say that again: They do not have to be an exact match! As long as they coordinate, or look like they are from the same family, you will be fine. Your shoes are not going to be seen up against your blouse or scarf. Also, shoes are likely to be made of a different material than your clothing, and the different textured surfaces would make even dye-matched items look different. The other plus to a color you love is that if someone does compliment you on your shoes, you have the perfect response… “Thanks, it’s my favorite color!”

Keep The Color in Your Palette

If your new shoe color is one of the colors in your personal color palette, or your wardrobe’s color palette, you will find it easier to mix and match with the pieces you already own. Why does this matter? It will save you from spending money on shoes only your closet will wear, and make it easier to work them into outfits and look pulled together. The exception to this rule would be if you are buying a color that you love but is unflattering on you. For me that would be bright yellow or olive green. I love them, but they don’t love me! I would buy them in a cute shoe though, to get a color fix and wear them with my neutrals for a better look.

Repeat the Color Near Your Face

Beauty Bundle: PinkThey key to wearing colored shoes and not having everyone staring at your feet is to draw the attention back up to your face with your shoe color. Some stylists call this topping and tailing. When looking at a person, humans start at the face and move downward toward the feet. This is a natural progression. When we get to the bottom, if there is a similar color at the top, our eye pops back up to the face. This is why wearing a shoe in your hair color will always work, because the color is already there at the top of your head. Now, if you want to wear pink shoes, there is no need to dye your hair pink! Just throw on a pink necklace, scarf, or earrings , or even a bold pink lipstick will help.

This is where the genius of Beauty Bundles comes in. When you buy a shoe that is not a color you already own and wear, grab an inexpensive scarf, pair or earrings or a necklace in that same shade. You will have the beginnings of a Beauty Bundle. If you decide you love the color and it loves you back, you can grow your bundle in bits and pieces over time. If you decide that color isn’t for you, you can gift the shoes and jewels together and start someone else out with a sweet bundle that might be just perfect for them!

A Last Note

If you have very challenging-to-fit feet, and would love to buy colored shoes, but they only make shoes that fit you in black, and if you are lucky: tan or white, don’t be discouraged! I am happy to introduce you to Angelus Shoe Paints. This versatile product is for leather shoes, and can change any shoe color to the color of your choice.  I am incredibly craft-challenged, and have successfully painted at least 3 pairs of shoes. A friend with “difficult” feet decided to paint her old and worn orthotics-friendly shoes, and is very happy with the results. She feels like she has a new pair of shoes, and a new lease on style.

Do you like colored shoes, or are they out of your comfort zone? What is your favorite pair of shoes? I’d love to know! Please share in the comments below…

Thanks to Catherine of Not Dressed as Lamb for the link up!

Holiday Dressing

Holiday Dressing

What makes a great holiday outfit? Ugly Christmas sweaters aside, what feels festive to you? It should really depend on the event. Caroling on a chilly night requires a different  ensemble than the office holiday ‘do. (Speaking of the holiday office ‘do… It’s still office, and NOT the place for cleavage, bra or booty!)

Some Sparkle

Sparkle doesn’t have to be diamonds. Choose the metallic shade that looks best on you. Statement earrings are a great way to keep attention on you (your face), and avoids the jangle of bracelets and the swinging and catching of necklaces that many find annoying. An inexpensive pair can be your holiday go-to. A metallic clutch to go along is another easy and inexpensive touch. Jeans, a tee and your earrings and clutch change the whole vibe from van driving to festive! Metallic “clutches” are everywhere this year. Look beyond the handbags to cosmetic bags and electronics gear organizers. Also look in the office supplies at supply pouches… These tend to be less expensive than the ones you find in the handbag department, and you can use them next year to keep your tote organized!

Some Cozy

What’s cozy? Please don’t  wear puppies or kittens! Think corduroy, cut or uncut, velvet, velveteen, velour, faux fur, fuzzy or marled knits. I have seen some great velvety cosmetic bags at my local big box store (red circles on the front…) with a tassel zipper pull that would make a great clutch. Cozy isn’t only for tops, though. Try corduroy or velvet jeans, or a faux fur scarf, in whatever color makes you look radiant. The point of faux is to be faux, so don’t worry about picking a “realistic” color!

Some Elegance

The soft sheen of pearls or pewter brings light to the darkness of winter. Imagine the glow of of white mistletoe berries contrasted with the green leaves. The draping of a waterfall cardigan can bring an elegant feel, or the luxurious hand of cashmere warms and regulates temperature like a dream. Lace, anyone? An oversized statement necklace, bracelet or ring that isn’t blingy feels elegant as well. Yours might be a wide silver cuff bracelet. Antique pieces and family heirlooms (grandma’s brooch or locket, or your aunt’s wedding ring that she wore on the boat over from the old country) all speak of tradition and connection. Don’t save them for “good”! If a holiday celebration isn’t good, what is? (I drink box wine from crystal, so any day is good for me!)

Some Color

The traditional reds and greens of the season feel festive, but avoid pairing them together. Even in their grown up version (burgundy and hunter) they can feel cliché, and look childish rather than youthful. The easy mix is with black, and since that can be too harsh for many complexions, why not try your favorite shade of red/pink or green with winter white, grey, taupe, or blue? Light blue and white are a great holiday combo, too, evoking clear skies and a snowy landscape. If you must wear all black, please at least add colored jewelry and a pashmina to soften and cheer your look.

Comfort!

Comfortable is a must for me! If the dress requires 2 Spanx and a pliers to pull up the zipper, you aren’t going to have very much fun. Unless you are a starlet whose job is to be stunning and you can act well enough to be happy even when boa-constricted, please try on your outfit before it’s time to head out the door, and determine if you are garbed in something you can spend the night nibbling, dancing, and socializing in. If sitting and entertaining small children are in the plan, take that into account, as well. Too tight trousers to the holiday concert will make you wish you the sugar-plum fairy would just drop dead so you can get home and into your jammies. Uncomfortable clothes = Bah, humbug!

What is your favorite holiday outfit? What item do you wear that always makes you feel special? Share in the comments below!

And many thanks to Katherine at #notlamb for the LinkUp!

What Makes an Outfit Work (Part 2)

So how does one put What Makes an Outfit Work (Part 1) into practice? Lots of trial and error, until it becomes second nature. Here’s an example…

Style Blogger in Ubiquitous Striped Top Snap!

Personality

I have a pretty out-there personality. I am friendly, mostly direct, and not afraid to speak my mind. My style recipe is Mischievous Femi-Modern. I don’t do girly feminine. I’m into bling, but not ruffles or florals. The bracelet stack is hiding in this casual shot, but that and earrings were my bling for the day. I have a lot of Classic in my personality, so Levi’s 501’s and the (ubiquitous) striped top. The Classic in me also tends toward the darker colors in my palette, rather than the lighter shades. The Feminine comes out in the silk scarf, the narrow suede shoes, and the bow on the toe.

Personal Coloring

My coloring is Sublime in the Absolute Color System. I am Sublime! (That is such fun to say!) The Absolute Color System has 18 different and very nuanced palettes. It’s the color system I have been trained in and I think it’s the best out there. I never fit very well into the Color Me Beautiful/Four Seasons system, and appreciate how this one works so well for me and my clients. My personal coloring is light rather than dark. The outfit on the right is tending too dark for me; you can see how much more harmonious the coloring of lighter outfit on the left is.

Color Contrast and Value Contrast

My personal coloring is 2 Neutrals plus 1 Color, which is (almost) reflected here. I have a lot of neutrals going on in the stripey shot. Denim, Dark Green, and the White in my top all behave as neutrals. My color is the plum in my shoes and scarf. The bright shoes could distract from the communication center (face), but repeating the color from the shoes with the scarf draws your attention back up where it belongs. To the left, the softer neutrals are more in line with my personal coloring; there are fewer neutrals, and they more closely mimic my hair color. The teal blouse keeps color (and attention) near my face. My Value Contrast is Medium High. The casual outfit contrast is higher than the more suited look on the left. The dark trim on the suit jacket gives the pop needed to create a higher value contrast. Without it, the look would be too low contrast.

Body Shape

I am a petite 8 Shape. The dark neutral jacket and jeans create a column of color to create a longer vertical line. That same column contains the stripes preventing the dreaded widening effect. Ideally, I should wear a trouser that is long, but I prefer a crop and fun shoe, so the column helps there, too. If I was not wearing the jacket, a full length skinny jean would look better here!  On the left, the grey trousers and tweed create a column as well, but it is chopped by the black trim at the jacket hem. Ideally, the waist detail is balanced by the verticals on the jacket front, and the heeled grey shoe carries the color to a longer line, as well.

Hope this helps you see how just a few of the pieces fit together to create an outfit that is you! (Or me, as the case may be…) What outfit feels most “you” and why? Please share in the comments below!

What Makes an Outfit Work? (Part 1)

What Makes an Outfit Work? (Part 1)

Have you ever seen someone dressed and think That’s amazing on her, but I could never wear that. So, what makes an outfit work? (Or NOT work?!) When I pull together an outfit for a client, my goal is for it to:

Reflect Your Personality

This is one reason an outfit may be perfect for one woman and feel like a costume on another. I was working with a client a few weeks ago who loves a Relaxed Feminine Creative “boho” look, but feels like a clown dressed so. It didn’t take much digging to discover that she is also an organized and responsible woman with a need for structure and routine. The “boho” outfits she was trying to create were leaving out all the Classic in her personality. When we added a little structure to the flowy, or a touch of “boho” to a more Classic look, she felt like herself, or at home in the outfits. It is important to encompass ALL the pieces of your personality when you dress.

Work with Your Personal Coloring

We have all been given a set of colors that flatter us and make us look our healthiest. You may be saying, I’ve never had my colors “done” so I don’t have colors. You have colors, whether you recognize them or not. They are the colors given you by God, or if you prefer, determined by your DNA. You have been gifted the perfect colors for you, and these change throughout our lives as our natural coloring changes. Our skin and hair softens and lightens in color as we get older (often starting in our 30’s), so the colors that looked amazing on us at 25 are probably not the same colors we look best in at 50, and those are different than the ones that will best suit us at 75! More about color terminology, here.

Harmonize with Your Color and Value Contrasts

Is your personal coloring neutral (hair, skin, and eyes) or colored? Maybe you are a combination of both. A man or woman whose personal coloring is very neutral (e.g. blonde hair, brown eyes, and neutral skin), will be most flattered by outfits composed of neutrals, or outfits that are monochromatic (one color), or made from colors closer on the color wheel. Often the bloggers who look amazing in their all neutral capsule wardrobes are those neutrals women. Maybe you are highly colored, with red hair and green eyes. Then make sure your outfits are comprised of two colors along with any neutral you are wearing. The goal is to have you wear your clothes, not to have your clothes wear you!

Value contrast is determined by the lightest and darkest colors of your person. Snow White, with her very dark hair and fair skin is a classic example of high value contrast. Cinderella is a lower value contrast princess, with her blond hair and fair complexion. Think about their signature outfits. The high contrast of Snow White’s dark bodice and bright skirt. reflects the high contrast of her natural coloring. Cinderella’s varying shades of light blue reflect the much lower value contrast of her personal coloring. Getting our value contrast right can make all the difference, and can “cover a multitude of (style) sins”!

Flatter Your Body Shape

One of the biggest struggles for women is that our bodies change throughout our lifetimes, sometimes repeatedly! Pregnancy and nursing, and at the other end, menopause, create a state of flux that can be frustrating. We may have known how to dress our pre-babies body, but now, extra weight from pregnancy, car-pooling or desk-sitting makes dressing a new challenge that we simply don’t have time or mental energy to research. Menopause can take a stylish woman by surprise when body parts start shifting along with the hormones. Our body shape is based on our skeleton, and how our weight is distributed on our bones. Knowing your shape doesn’t tell you what to buy (That’s your personality’s job!), but it does tell you where you want (and don’t want) horizontal and vertical lines, and details to draw attention to assets and away from your less loved characteristics.

When you take some time to get to know yourself inside and out, pulling together a great outfit becomes easier every day. (And dressing can become fun again!)

What outfit do you feel most confident and yourself in? I’d love to know! Please share in the comments below!

 

Colors and Neutrals

Colors and Neutrals

Sometimes I feel like a Color Convert, or maybe a recovering Blackaholic. Either way, I have seen the light! (Horrible science pun, I know…) I appreciate all the colors of the rainbow, and feel obligated to spread the color gospel.

Color Preferences

Some color preferences are universal; some are cultural, and some are purely personal. Most of us have a favorite color, and interestingly, different favorite colors for clothing. As children, these colors are usually the same, but as adults, we often choose a favorite clothing color that becomes a default. This handy sorting mechanism may save time shopping, but it can also be limiting, or downright unflattering if we choose a color that doesn’t suit our personal coloring. Many people think you can tell a lot about a person by his or her favorite color, but often those favorites go back to experiences we have had, either positive or negative. If you had a horrible time in middle school, and your school’s colors were garnet and gold, you may avoid those colors like the plague. If you were on the winning team and your team color was orange, you may associate orange with success. Time spent thinking about the colors you love and despise and why can be a small journey into your past and therapeutic to boot!

Neutrals

I know many a woman with a sea of neutrals in her wardrobe. By neutrals, we mean those colors that are not found in the rainbow, black, white, navy blue, grey, brown, tan/khaki, taupe, camel, and variations on these. To confuse the issue, there are colored neutrals as well! Colored neutrals are those rainbow colors with enough black added so that they work as neutrals. Deep burgundy, dark olive, deep teal, eggplant, and other similar shades are colored neutrals.

WarmCoolNeutralsA wardrobe full of neutrals may allow you to mix and match almost everything in your closet, but your outfits will often feel lifeless and draining, unless you add color with accessories. I see many women who buy bags full of neutrals because they are afraid of making a color mistake. Neutrals are “safe.” Furniture retailers and decorators will tell you the same principle applies to upholstered items; customers will regularly default to the safety of a neutral. The world does not need more beige sofas or walls!

The Tyranny of Black

Bridgette Raes, a New York stylist, coined the term “Blackcident” for those women whose wardrobes overflow with black. I hear (and myself often gave) all kinds of reasons for black-heavy wardrobes. “Black makes you look thin.” “Black clothes look more expensive.” “Black looks good with everything.” “Everyone looks good in black.” “Black is chic.” “Black hides stains.” And on, and on… Most of these are opinion rather than fact! Recently, I was in a dressing room with a client, and a mother nearby was shopping with her petite, fair-skinned, blond, high school daughter for (college) interview suits. They found a darling navy sheath dress with cream trim and a coordinating jacket. Then mom saw a black crepe dress and matching jacket. The sleeveless black dress was perfect for daughter’s figure; the neckline was flattering, and her bare arms helped break up the dark color, but when the young lady put on the jacket, she looked overwhelmed, and unwell. As the daughter hemmed and hawed, mom was determined that the black suit made her girl look sophisticated and serious, rather than like an orphan in mourning.

Be Bold:  Pick Another Neutral, or Two!

So instead of black, how about a different neutral, or two, or three? Even if black was a great color for us when we were young, it can often be harsh and aging as we grow in wisdom. Since letting my natural grey shine through, grey has become my new black. I have been transitioning my once black-heavy wardrobe into one relying on grey, white, and navy as neutrals, depending on the season. (I still have a few black pieces, but these have become the exception, rather than my rule.) For the warmer complexioned, how about a trio of ivory/light tan, olive, and warm navy? These would look amazing paired with coral and turquoise for accent colors.

How about you? Do neutrals form the backbone of your wardrobe? Or does your closet look like the rainbow? Please let me know in the comments below! I love to hear your thoughts!

 

 

 

Style/Fashion Myths

Style/Fashion Myths

Myth: Black shoes go with everything.
Reality: Black shoes go with everything only if you have black hair! Otherwise, shoes the color of your skin or hair go with everything!

Myth: Don’t wear navy and black together.
Reality: Navy and black worn together can look very chic when combined intentionally! The same goes for black and brown.

Myth: Never wear white after Labor Day.
Reality: If you look good in white, wear it all year long!

M: Don’t mix metals.
Reality: Mix away! To make it look like you meant it, make sure to choose at least 1/3 of one metal.

Myth: Flats are more comfortable than heels.
Reality: A low heel can be more comfortable (and better for your feet) than flats!

Myth: You shouldn’t repeat an outfit during the week.
Reality: If the outfit is made of neutral basics, no one will notice, especially if you change your accessories!

Myth: Clothes need washing after each wearing.
Reality: Clothes last longer the less they are washed. Many clothes only need an airing before wearing a second or third time.

Myth: One size fits all.
Reality: One size fits no one well!

Myth: There is something wrong with my body; I can’t find clothes that fit.
Reality: There is NOTHING wrong with my body; there is something wrong with these clothes!

Myth: A $5 shirt is a good deal.
Reality: A good deal is defined by Cost Per Wear. If you only wear that shirt one time, it cost you $5. But the $100 dress that you wear once a week for two years costs you less than $1 per wear. Think CPW, not cost!

Saturday Share

Saturday Share

Since we finally made it to the weekend, you may have a few extra minutes to surf, or maybe do some reading… Here are some of my recent favorites!

Janice Riggs at The Vivienne Files is a woman after my own analytical heart! Check out her post-trip packing analysis from her recent trip to Dublin. (Why did everyone I know go overseas this summer, and I was left here in town?!)

Color is a fascinating topic, and how we use it can affect how we feel, and how others relate to us. Take a peek at (another of) Imogen Lamport and Jill Chivers’s brillant video/blog articles about how color and contrast communicate.

For the Thrift-Minded, a primer from Sally of Already Pretty on the ways to not get lost in the black hole that can be the thrift store. These are some of the same ways to look/categorize that I use when Personal Shopping with clients.

From Catherine at Not Dressed As Lamb, a discussion of fashion bloggers and size (and what it means) along with links to some great mid-size fashion bloggers out there.

Last, but certainly not least, a “real” book. I love The Paradox of Choice, by Barry Schwartz, and learn new things about humans in general, and myself in particular, each time I reread it. It’s a beautiful examination of the science and psychology of choice, that still manages to be entertaining and funny. If you feel overwhelmed by decisions, he shares great daily-use strategies that free up brain space and energy for the things on which you want to focus.

Happy reading!

What have you enjoyed reading this week? Please share in the comments below!

Got Wardrobe Orphans?

Got Wardrobe Orphans?

What’s a Wardrobe Orphan?

Wardrobe Orphans (WO’s) are those items we love in the store, we buy, and bring home, but never wear. Often they hang in our closets with tags still on. We might smile to see it hanging in the closet, or it may make us feel guilty; an orphan never makes it onto our body and out of the house. Maybe the orphan doesn’t go with anything, or maybe it just feels funny on. Let’s talk about some of the reasons we have WO’s, and some ways to avoid them.

Personality

The Personality Orphan can sometimes be attributed to shopping with a friend who may have a very different style personality than you. Maybe you are predominantly Classic and Feminine, and your friend is a Relaxed Creative. The shirt she loved, and you bought, fits her personality but doesn’t work for you because it doesn’t fit yours! You may love a pattern, color or style, and the friend who wears them well, but that pattern/color/style never feels right on you, because it isn’t your style personality.

Another common shopping fail occurs when we shop with someone who has a fixed idea of what (they think) you should wear. Beware shopping with relations… (Moms and teens battle this one all the time!) The best way to avoid these Personality Orphans is to know thyself! Work on honing your Style Recipe. Keep your Style Recipe on a card in your wallet. (Not an outfit recipe, that’s a horse of a different color! A bit of Style Recipe information can be found here.) Before you pull out your wallet to pay, look at the card and check if the garment you are holding fits your style words. If it doesn’t, analyze what it is you love about it, and apply that to an item that does fit your Recipe.

It is good to step out of our comfort zone and try new things, but baby-step it. Try just one new part of the pattern/style/color rather than all at once. Maybe you want to try the cold-shoulder trend. So, buy that top in a color you know you look great in. That gives it the familiarity you may need to take the leap and wear it out of the house!

Color

Color Orphans are items that don’t go with what you already own, or with your personal coloring. There are two main ways to avoid color clash orphans.

(1) You can limit the color palette in your wardrobe to 2-3 neutrals, and 2-3 accent colors. If the item is not one of your neutrals or accents, you can feel free to leave it behind, or even better, ask the store clerk if it comes in one of your wardrobe colors. This method requires a great deal of self-discipline, and is not for everyone, especially those who crave variety.

(2) Another method for avoiding the dreaded clash is to have a Personal Color Analysis. There are lots of systems out there; most have come a long way from the old 4 Seasons of the 1980’s.  My favorite is the (very nuanced) Absolute Color System, and it is the one I use with my clients. (Here you can see the 9 warm palettes!) Knowing your personal palette gives you hundreds of colors to choose from, and because they share the same color properties, they mix and match without the dreaded “clash”

Personal Pet Peeve: Color systems that come with personality labels, or tell you to dye your hair to fit your type. Beware!

If people ask “Are you feeling alright?” when you wear something, that’s a cue that it is not a good color for your personal coloring! Using your personal color palette to select the colors that best flatter you helps you avoid the “Are you okay?” from those you meet during your day.

Body Shape

A Body Shape Orphan is an item you bought that just doesn’t work for your body shape Frequently BSO’s will make you feel frumpy, or overexposed/tarty; they may make you physically uncomfortable. The waistband is too snug, the shape is boxy and you need shaping, the cut is too low, or too tight. The boots squeeze your calves; those shoes give you a blister every time you wear them. Some Body Shape Orphans can be rescued with a trip to the tailor, cobbler, or a cami to cover the extra cleavage, but often it is best to say goodbye to them. . When you try on everyday clothes, make sure they will work for your everyday activities! Sit, walk, and stretch. Make sure the clothes can do what you want them to!

Knowing your body shape can help you avoid these orphans by makeing you aware of what cuts, styles, and proportions look best on you, and helps you avoid the boxy, oversized, frump zone. Clothes do not have to be baggy to be comfortable, they just need to fit your shape. I cannot say this enough: If you are not employed as a fit model, don’t expect clothes to fit off the rack! Alterations should be a regular part of life for us mere mortals.

The best way to avoid orphans is to be a conscious shopper. Look carefully before you buy. If you cannot make at least 3 outfits with the new piece and what you already own, save your money. Once home, if you need to buy an entirely new outfit to make an orphan work, it is probably best to return it or set it free. It will be perfect for someone else, so donate it, consign it, or have a clothing swap with friends. Make it a Wardrobe Orphan Home Finding Party! Your wardrobe orphan may just be someone else’s outfit completer!

What orphan is hiding in your closet? Please let me know in the comments below!

 

 

Fall Dressing in Hot Weather

You are tired of your summer clothes. Fall fashions are in the stores. Fall outfit inspirations like this one by Kotnourka are in magazines, and on websites everywhere. (Yes, Pinterest, I see you!) These looks are lovely, but where I live, daytime temps are still pushing 90 degrees (hurricane notwithstanding), and even the thought of a sweater causes heatstroke. Inspiration boards abound with knee high boots with jeans tucked in, plaid scarves casually thrown over tee shirts, leather jackets, turtlenecks, long duster cardigans over another sweater, chunky knits, and ponchos. Where I live, just trying these on in the store brings on a rash. So what’s a girl to do? Here are a few ways to get your fall on when your climate is just too darn hot…

Darker Colors

Maybe you will be wearing sleeveless tops well into November. (We certainly do here!) Sort through your closet (or drawers) and pull out the darker ones, the more traditionally fall tones. If you are cool complexioned, try wine, navy, dark turquoise/teal, deep raspberry, spruce green, or purple. Warmer complexioned ladies might like brown, mustard, pumpkin, olive or loden green, warm turquoise or teal, warm navy, or red-violet. These feel more like fall than the brights, pastels, or whites and creams that so often take over a hot weather wardrobe. Even something as small as a darker nail polish can give you the change you crave!

Gold Jewelry

I don’t know why, maybe it’s the reference to turning leaves, but gold jewelry and less shiny pieces look and feel more fall to me than silver. If you don’t wear gold because it doesn’t suit your coloring, then try rose gold, pewter, or hematite finshes. I am a cool complexioned girl myself, and don’t look my best in gold, but I pull a few pieces out and wear them to death in the fall, and then tuck them away again until the next year. Layering a few necklaces can be a great way to get a layered look without the heat.

Rock Those Boots

I know, didn’t I say boots and heatstroke just above? Rock booties for a fall look with less heat. Or if you are a knee-high boot lover like I am, as soon as the daytime highs drop low enough (everyone has a different number for this one–mine’s between 75 and 80 degrees) wear those boots with bare legs and a dress. No one needs to know you have little cotton socks on keeping your feel cool and dry!

Suede

Here’s another material that just shouts fall, and the color doesn’t really even matter. Dig out that cute suede bag, or go hit the craft store and wrap some suede cord twice around your neck for a choker. Suede fringe or tassel necklaces are everywhere. I love the new Pearlsueded by Premier Designs ( I get nothing for this plug, it’s just a darling piece that is adjustable, so you can wear it short, too. How cool is that?) If you don’t have a PD jeweler, let me know below, and I can connect you with mine. (She’s so fabulous, my husband jokingly calls her “my dealer”!)

What are your favorite fall cheats for hot weather? I would love to hear them! Please share in the comments below…

Saturday Reading (Watching or Listening, too!)

Saturday Reading (Watching or Listening, too!)

What’s on your nightstand? Or in your bag for when you have a few minutes in a waiting room, or at the bus stop? Maybe on your phone? Since it is Saturday, I share a little light reading/watching for your weekend…

A few months ago, I picked up Beauty and Cosmetics 1550-1950 secondhand. What a treasure! I love history, but not the memorizing dates part; my passion is the how-people-really-lived part. Sarah Jane Downing shares fascinating tidbits, gorgeous paintings, and old advertisements. It is a glorious peek into how our concepts of beauty have changed, and the lengths we go to to achieve “beauty.” This little volume  sent me down a rabbit hole of history exploration… I found more than 15 other Shire Library titles that I simply must read! Aaaaarrrgh!

One of my favorite YouTubers is Justine Leconte, a French fashion designer living in Berlin. She is in the middle of a series about planning and creating a capsule wardrobe, and I had to laugh when I realized that her color plan for fall is startlingly similar to mine! There are thousands of capsule wardrobe posts and videos out there; Justine’s series stands out for its great explanations. (And her endearing accent!)

Catherine Summers, of Not Dressed as Lamb, looks at style with a witty and irreverent attitude.  In this post, she takes a critical look at the idea that we “must wear what suits us.” I love what she says about wearing what makes us happy, and expressing our personalities with our clothing choices. Fortunately, flattering and happy-making do not have to be mutually exclusive! Catherine has some very perceptive readers, and the comment thread is usually worth scrolling down for…

One of my favorite spots for visual inspiration is You Look Fab. I love a dress and sandals, or flats when the weather is hot (which it is here a LOT), and Angie’s recent post with dress and sandals/low heels is a great springboard. You likely have something similar in your closet. Check her out here.

Any favorite fashion/style articles or bloggers you follow? Let me know about them in the comments below!